Charles Babbage

Charles Babbage, (born December 26, 1791, London, England—died October 18, 1871, London), English mathematician and inventor who is credited with having conceived the first automatic digital computer.

Charles Babbage
QUICK FACTS
BORN
December 26, 1791
LondonEngland
DIED
October 18, 1871 (aged 79)
LondonEngland
INVENTIONS
DID YOU KNOW?
  • Babbage worked outside mathematics on code-breaking and philosophy, as well.
  • Babbage was a very popular dinner guest because of his story-telling skills.
  • Among his many projects, Charles labored on lighthouse signals and a version of tic-tac-toe.

In 1812 Babbage helped found the Analytical Society, whose object was to introduce developments from the European continent into English mathematics. In 1816 he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of London. He was instrumental in founding the Royal Astronomical (1820) and Statistical (1834) societies.

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The idea of mechanically calculating mathematical tables first came to Babbage in 1812 or 1813. Later he made a small calculator that could perform certain mathematical computations to eight decimals. Then in 1823 he obtained government support for the design of a projected machine, the Difference Engine, with a 20-decimal capacity. The Difference Engine was a digital device: it operated on discrete digits rather than smooth quantities, and the digits were decimal (0–9), represented by positions on toothed wheels rather than binary digits (“bits”). When one of the toothed wheels turned from nine to zero, it caused the next wheel to advance one position, carrying the digit. Like modern computers, the Difference Engine had storage—that is, a place where data could be held temporarily for later processing. Its construction required the development of mechanical engineeringtechniques, to which Babbage of necessity devoted himself. In the meantime (1828–39), he served as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. However, the full engine, designed to be room-sized, was never built, at least not by Babbage. All design and construction ceased in 1833, when Joseph Clement, the machinist responsible for actually building the machine, refused to continue unless he was prepaid.

During the mid-1830s Babbage developed plans for the Analytical Engine, the forerunner of the modern digital computer. In that device he envisioned the capability of performing any arithmetical operation on the basis of instructions from punched cards, a memory unit in which to store numbers, sequential control, and most of the other basic elements of the present-day computer. As with the Difference Engine, the project was far more complex than anything theretofore built. The memory unit was to be large enough to hold 1,000 50-digit numbers; this was larger than the storage capacity of any computer built before 1960. The machine was to be steam-driven and run by one attendant.

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In 1843 Babbage’s friend mathematician Ada Lovelacetranslated a French paper about the Analytical Engine and, in her own annotations, published how it could perform a sequence of calculations, the first computer program. The Analytical Engine, however, was never completed. Babbage’s design was forgotten until his unpublished notebooks were discovered in 1937. In 1991 British scientists built Difference Engine No. 2—accurate to 31 digits—to Babbage’s specifications, and in 2000 the printer for the Difference Engine was also built.

Babbage made notable contributions in other areas as well. He assisted in establishing the modern postal system in England and compiled the first reliable actuarial tables. He also invented a type of speedometer and the locomotive cowcatcher.


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